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Leo Rivera
Leo Rivera

The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Christian Myth: A Free Pdf Book that Reveals the Hidden History of Christianity



The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Christian Myth pdf free




Have you ever wondered about the origins of Christianity and how it relates to the ancient Jewish texts known as the Dead Sea Scrolls? If so, you might be interested in reading a book that challenges the conventional views on these topics and offers a radical alternative. The book is called The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Christian Myth, and it was written by John Allegro, one of the first scholars who studied the scrolls. In this article, we will give you an overview of what the Dead Sea Scrolls are, what John Allegro's book argues, and how you can access a free pdf version of it. We will also provide you with some FAQs to help you learn more about this fascinating subject.




The Dead Sea Scrolls And The Christian Myth Pdf Free



What are the Dead Sea Scrolls?




The Dead Sea Scrolls are a collection of ancient manuscripts that were discovered between 1947 and 1956 in caves near Qumran, a site on the northwestern shore of the Dead Sea in Israel. The scrolls date from the 3rd century BCE to the 1st century CE, and they contain texts written in Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek. They are considered to be one of the most important archaeological discoveries of the 20th century, as they provide invaluable insights into the history, culture, and religion of Judaism and Christianity in the Second Temple period.


The Qumran community and the Essenes




The majority of the scrolls are believed to have been written or collected by a Jewish sect that lived in Qumran and its vicinity. This sect is usually identified with the Essenes, one of the three main Jewish groups mentioned by ancient historians such as Josephus and Philo. The Essenes were known for their strict observance of the law, their communal lifestyle, their celibacy, their eschatological expectations, and their opposition to the Temple establishment in Jerusalem. They also had a distinctive interpretation of the scriptures and a rich literary tradition that included rules, hymns, poems, calendars, liturgies, prayers, apocalyptic works, wisdom literature, biblical interpretation, and biblically based apocryphal works.


The contents and genres of the Dead Sea Scrolls




The Dead Sea Scrolls contain a variety of texts that reflect the diversity and complexity of Judaism in the Second Temple period. Some of the texts are copies of biblical books, such as the Torah, the Prophets, and the Psalms. Some are commentaries on biblical passages, such as the Pesher or Midrash genres. Some are sectarian documents that express the beliefs and practices of the Qumran community, such as the Community Rule, the War Scroll, or the Temple Scroll. Some are apocryphal or pseudepigraphical works that expand on biblical stories or characters, such as the Genesis Apocryphon, the Book of Enoch, or the Testament of Levi. Some are hymns and poems that praise God or express lamentation, such as the Hodayot or Thanksgiving Hymns. Some are calendars and liturgies that regulate the religious life of the community, such as the Book of Jubilees or the Songs of Sabbath Sacrifice. Some are wisdom texts that offer ethical or practical advice, such as the Instruction or Musar leMevin. Some are apocalyptic texts that reveal secrets about the end times or heavenly realms, such as The Book of Mysteries or The Book of Giants.


The relation of the Dead Sea Scrolls to the New Testament and early Christianity




The Dead Sea Scrolls shed light on the historical and cultural context of the New Testament and early Christianity. They show that Judaism in the Second Temple period was not monolithic but diverse and dynamic, and that Christianity emerged from one of its branches. They also show that some of the ideas and concepts that are found in Christianity have parallels or antecedents in Judaism, such as messianism, dualism, eschatology, angelology, demonology, soteriology, baptism, communion, covenant, law, grace, faith, works, etc. However, they also show that there are significant differences between ```html the role and identity of Jesus, the nature and function of the church, the relationship between Jews and Gentiles, the interpretation and fulfillment of prophecy, etc. Therefore, the Dead Sea Scrolls challenge or confirm traditional views on Jesus, Paul, and other figures depending on how one reads and compares them.


What is The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Christian Myth?




One of the most controversial and provocative books that uses the Dead Sea Scrolls to challenge the conventional views on Christianity is The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Christian Myth, written by John Allegro in 1979. In this book, Allegro argues that Christianity is not based on historical facts but on a pre-Christian gnostic mythology that was encoded in the Dead Sea Scrolls. He also argues that Jesus Christ never existed as a historical person but was a mythical figure that represented a hallucinogenic mushroom. In this section, we will give you an overview of who John Allegro was, what his book argues, and how his book was received and influenced later scholarship and popular culture.


John Allegro's biography and credentials




John Allegro was born in 1923 in London, England. He studied classics and oriental languages at Oxford University, where he specialized in Hebrew and Aramaic. He served in the Royal Navy during World War II, and then joined the international team of scholars who were assigned to edit and publish the Dead Sea Scrolls in 1953. He was one of the first scholars who recognized the importance of the scrolls for understanding the origins of Christianity, and he published several books and articles on them, such as The People of the Dead Sea Scrolls (1958), The Treasure of Qumran (1960), and The Dead Sea Scrolls: A Reappraisal (1964). He also became a popular lecturer and broadcaster who introduced the scrolls to a wider audience.


John Allegro's thesis and evidence




John Allegro's thesis is that Christianity is not a historical religion but a mythological one that originated from a pre-Christian gnostic sect that used psychedelic mushrooms as a means of spiritual enlightenment. He claims that this sect encoded their secret teachings in the Dead Sea Scrolls using a complex system of wordplay and symbolism that he calls the "sacred mushroom code". He also claims that Jesus Christ was not a real person but a personification of the mushroom, and that his life, death, and resurrection were allegories of the mushroom's effects. He uses linguistic, historical, and archaeological evidence to support his thesis, such as:


  • The similarity between the names of Jesus and the mushroom in various languages, such as Yesu, Yeshu, Iesous, Iesus, Amanita, Amen, etc.



  • The presence of mushroom imagery and symbolism in ancient art, literature, and religion, such as the tree of life, the cross, the fish, the bread, the wine, etc.



  • The parallels between the Qumran texts and the Christian writings in terms of theology, cosmology, ethics, ritual, etc.



  • The influence of ancient Near Eastern cultures and religions on Judaism and Christianity, such as Sumerian, Babylonian, Egyptian, Persian, etc.



  • The role of political and religious factors in shaping and suppressing the original gnostic message of Christianity.



John Allegro's reception and legacy




John Allegro's book received criticism and condemnation from both academic and religious circles. He was accused of being sensationalist, irresponsible, unscientific, blasphemous, heretical, etc. He was also ostracized by his colleagues in the Dead Sea Scrolls team and denied access to further manuscripts. He responded to his critics by defending his views and challenging them to debate him publicly. He also continued to write more books on related topics, such as The Sacred Mushroom and the Cross (1970), The End of a Road (1970), The Chosen People (1971), Lost Gods (1977), etc.


John Allegro's book influenced later scholarship and popular culture on the Dead Sea Scrolls and Christianity. Some scholars have followed or modified his approach to decipher the scrolls, such as Robert Eisenman, Barbara Thiering, Michael Baigent, Richard Leigh, etc. Some authors have used his ideas to create fictional or speculative works, such as Dan Brown, Philip Pullman, Graham Hancock, etc. Some movements have adopted his views as part of their beliefs or practices, such as the Raelians, the Church of the Holy Light of the Queen, etc.


How can you access The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Christian Myth pdf free?




If you are interested in reading John Allegro's book for yourself, you might be wondering how you can access a free pdf version of it. There are several options available, but each one has its pros and cons. In this section, we will list some of the possible ways to access a free pdf version of John Allegro's book online or offline, and discuss their reliability and legality.


Online sources




One of the easiest ways to access a free pdf version of John Allegro's book is to use online sources, such as websites that offer a free pdf download or online reading of the book. Some examples are:


  • https://archive.org/details/deadseascrollsch0000alle



  • https://www.pdfdrive.com/the-dead-sea-scrolls-and-the-christian-myth-e158789078.html



  • https://b-ok.cc/book/5237959/8f6c8f



The pros of using online sources are that they are convenient, fast, and free. You can access the book anytime and anywhere with an internet connection. You can also save the file to your device or print it out if you want. The cons of using online sources are that they are not always reliable or legal. Some websites may have broken links, low-quality files, viruses, malware, etc. Some websites may also violate the copyrights of the author or publisher by distributing the book without their permission or consent. Therefore, you should be careful and responsible when using online sources.


Offline sources




Another way to access a free pdf version of John Allegro's book is to use offline sources, such as libraries or institutions that have a physical copy of the book that you can borrow or access for free. Some examples are:


  • The British Library in London, England



  • The Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., USA



  • The University of Manchester Library in Manchester, England



  • The University of Sydney Library in Sydney, Australia



  • The National Library of Israel in Jerusalem, Israel



The pros of using offline sources are that they are reliable and legal. You can access the original or authorized edition of the book with high-quality printing and binding. You can also consult other related books or resources in the same library or institution. The cons of using offline sources are that they are not always convenient or available. You may need to travel to the location of the library or institution, which may be far or expensive. You may also need to register or apply for a membership or permission to access the book, which may take time or money. You may also have a limited time or number of copies to borrow or access the book.


Alternative sources




A third way to access a free pdf version of John Allegro's book is to use alternative sources, such as other books or articles that discuss John Allegro's book or similar topics that you can access for free or for a low cost. Some examples are:


  • The Dead Sea Scrolls: A Very Short Introduction by Timothy Lim (2017)



  • The Dead Sea Scrolls and Christian Origins by Joseph Fitzmyer (2000)



  • The Dead Sea Scrolls Deception by Michael Baigent and Richard Leigh (1991)



  • The Sacred Mushroom and the Cross: A Study of the Nature and Origins of Christianity Within the Fertility Cults of the Ancient Near East by John Allegro (1970)



  • John Marco Allegro: The Maverick of the Dead Sea Scrolls by Judith Anne Brown (2005)



The pros of using alternative sources are that they are more accessible and affordable. You can find them in various formats and platforms, ```html contrast different perspectives and arguments on the same topic. The cons of using alternative sources are that they are not always relevant or helpful. You may not find the exact information or analysis that you are looking for. You may also encounter biased or inaccurate views or interpretations that may mislead or confuse you.


Conclusion




In conclusion, The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Christian Myth is a book that uses the Dead Sea Scrolls to challenge the conventional views on Christianity and propose a radical alternative. It was written by John Allegro, one of the first scholars who studied the scrolls and became a controversial figure in the field. The book argues that Christianity is not based on historical facts but on a pre-Christian gnostic mythology that was encoded in the scrolls using a "sacred mushroom code". It also argues that Jesus Christ never existed as a historical person but was a mythical figure that represented a hallucinogenic mushroom. The book received criticism and condemnation from both academic and religious circles, but it also influenced later scholarship and popular culture on the Dead Sea Scrolls and Christianity. If you want to read the book for yourself, you can access a free pdf version of it online or offline, or use alternative sources that discuss the book or similar topics.


If you are interested in learning more about the Dead Sea Scrolls and John Allegro's book, here are some FAQs that might help you:


FAQs




Q: How many Dead Sea Scrolls are there and where are they kept?


  • A: There are about 900 Dead Sea Scrolls that comprise about 25,000 fragments. They are kept in various locations, such as the Shrine of the Book in Jerusalem, the Jordan Museum in Amman, the Rockefeller Museum in Jerusalem, etc.



Q: How can I see the Dead Sea Scrolls for myself?


  • A: You can see some of the original scrolls in museums or exhibitions that display them periodically. You can also see digital images of all the scrolls online at https://www.deadseascrolls.org.il/.



Q: What is the current status of Dead Sea Scrolls research?


  • A: Dead Sea Scrolls research is an ongoing and active field that involves many disciplines and methods, such as archaeology, paleography, philology, history, theology, etc. There are still many unresolved questions and debates about the scrolls, such as their authorship, date, origin, meaning, etc.



Q: Is John Allegro's book still relevant or valid?


  • A: John Allegro's book is still relevant as a historical document that reflects his personal views and experiences as a Dead Sea Scrolls scholar. It is also still valid as a provocative and challenging work that invites readers to question their assumptions and explore alternative possibilities. However, it is not widely accepted or endorsed by most scholars or believers who find his arguments unconvincing or offensive.



Q: Are there any other books or resources that support John Allegro's thesis?


A: There are some books or resources that support John Allegro's thesis or offer similar or related arguments, such as:


  • The Sacred Mushroom and The Cross: A study of the nature and origins of Christianity within the fertility cults of the ancient Near East by John M. Allegro (1970)



  • The Jesus Mysteries: Was the "Original Jesus" a Pagan God? by Timothy Freke and Peter Gandy (1999)



  • The Jesus Puzzle: Did Christianity Begin with a Mythical Christ? Challenging the Existence of an Historical Jesus by Earl Doherty (2005)



  • The Mushroom in Christian Art: The Identity of Jesus in the Development of Christianity by John A. Rush (2011)



  • The Psychedelic Gospels: The Secret History of Hallucinogens in Christianity by Jerry B. Brown and Julie M. Brown (2016)



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